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The effects of a bad call center supervisor

The effects of a bad call center supervisor

[fa icon="calendar"] Feb 7, 2013 8:02:10 AM / by Briana Songer

Briana Songer

What happens inside a work environment when a person is designated as a leader, and they are just not suited for the job? The call center can feel the consequences when they place someone in a management position without being aware if they are able to do their job properly. This unfortunately happens quite often when it comes to call center supervisors.

What happens inside a work environment when a person is designated as a leader, and they are just not suited for the job? The call center can feel the consequences when they place someone in a management position without being aware if they are able to do their job properly. This unfortunately happens quite often when it comes to call center supervisors.

In many cases, it happens when great agents suddenly become supervisors. However, many lack the leadership skills and a mentor who has taught them how to manage groups. They then face the fear of the unknown: How can they develop those essential soft skills to motivate their team? Many times, they begin to look inside themselves and find that yes, they are able to train, motivate and manage people. In that case, the Call Center gets a good supervisor. And if that doesn't happen? The Call Center then loses a great seller and instead, gets a bad supervisor.

The Call Center world is a high speed, dynamic place. The one thing that always seems to be missing is time. We understand that when someone becomes a supervisor, they don't always have a manual explaining exactly what their role and activities should be. This ''manual'' tends to appear from needs that appear within the work environment. With that in mind, they must also take on the responsibility of training and motivating their agents, reach goals, report to their superiors, monitor calls....it's a long list.

The importance of having a quality supervisors is one that if they don't exist, a spiraling chain effect can happen. A customer who calls in doesn't receive proper service from an agent who does a poor job. They fail to meet their goals from a lack of training, the Call Center looks bad in front of their customer and finally, their image stays damaged from a poorly resolved call.

Providing quality means that a supervisor should be properly trained. They should be able to develop and be coached on soft skills and then turn around and use those skills with their peers. Supervisors must be provided with the necessary tools to be able to manage and facilitate the many call center processes. The "human side" of learning can be done parallel to the "technical side". This way of learning can save time without forgetting important steps when forming a new supervisor. Evaluating the human side is different, since obviously, not everyone is equal. Not everyone responds or learns the same way.

The most important point is for call centers to raise awareness about how vital it is to have a good supervisor, and the characteristics that must be developed to move their group of agents forward.

"In times of change, those who are open to learning will take over the future, while those who think they know everything will be well equipped for a world that no longer exists" Eric Hoffer.

(This post was translated from the original)

In many cases, it happens when great agents suddenly become supervisors. However, many lack the leadership skills and a mentor who has taught them how to manage groups. They then face the fear of the unknown: How can they develop those essential soft skills to motivate their team? Many times, they begin to look inside themselves and find that yes, they are able to train, motivate and manage people. In that case, the Call Center gets a good supervisor. And if that doesn't happen? The Call Center then loses a great seller and instead, gets a bad supervisor.

The Call Center world is a high speed, dynamic place. The one thing that always seems to be missing is time. We understand that when someone becomes a supervisor, they don't always have a manual explaining exactly what their role and activities should be. This ''manual'' tends to appear from needs that appear within the work environment. With that in mind, they must also take on the responsibility of training and motivating their agents, reach goals, report to their superiors, monitor calls....it's a long list.

The importance of having a quality supervisors is one that if they don't exist, a spiraling chain effect can happen. A customer who calls in doesn't receive proper service from an agent who does a poor job. They fail to meet their goals from a lack of training, the Call Center looks bad in front of their customer and finally, their image stays damaged from a poorly resolved call.

Providing quality means that a supervisor should be properly trained. They should be able to develop and be coached on soft skills and then turn around and use those skills with their peers. Supervisors must be provided with the necessary tools to be able to manage and facilitate the many call center processes. The "human side" of learning can be done parallel to the "technical side". This way of learning can save time without forgetting important steps when forming a new supervisor. Evaluating the human side is different, since obviously, not everyone is equal. Not everyone responds or learns the same way.

The most important point is for call centers to raise awareness about how vital it is to have a good supervisor, and the characteristics that must be developed to move their group of agents forward.

"In times of change, those who are open to learning will take over the future, while those who think they know everything will be well equipped for a world that no longer exists" Eric Hoffer.

(This post was translated from the original)

Topics: supervisor, Contact Center, Agents, call centers

Briana Songer

Written by Briana Songer

Marketing Director at PlayVox

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